Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common “pinched nerve” condition that neurologists see. It is a form of compression neuropathy The typical patient comes in with complaints of hand or arm pain associated with one or more numb fingers. There is usually sparing of the little finger. This painful numbness will frequently wake affected patients from their sleep. They will complain of a swollen feeling in their hand (or both hands) associated with painful numbness affecting all but the little finger.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by compression of the median nerve (the “carpal tunnel nerve”) as it pass under the carpal tunnel ligament. The carpal tunnel is located at the wrist. There is a small band of tissue across this to hold down the median nerve and vein. When the carpal tunnel becomes too narrowed, the median nerve becomes “pinched” and the vein is compressed. This combination of events results in the hand becoming numb and swollen. Carpal tunnel symptoms frequently occur only at night, during sleep. This is because we all have a tendency to sleep with our wrists slightly flexed. This position further narrows the carpal tunnel, causing symptoms. As the carpal tunnel narrows further, with time, patients will develop daytime hand numbness. Holding a newspaper, magazine or steering wheel can bring on symptoms. In more severe cases hand grip weakness can occur. Patients find that they have difficulty removing jar lids or may drop objects. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs in both hand about 50% of the time.

CTS is diagnosed, most commonly by a neurologist, on the basis of the patient’s symptoms and detailed neurological exam. Electrical diagnostic testing, nerve conduction studies (NCV), are necessary to confirm carpal tunnel syndrome – particularly if surgery is being considered. Many patients can have carpal tunnel symptoms and have normal NCV studies. These patients are not candidates for surgery. The standard of care medical treatment for CTS is wearing a cock-up wrist brace. These braces prevent wrist flexion, thereby reducing the pressure on the median nerve. Frequently patients can “cure” their CTS with wearing a brace. For more severe symptoms with abnormal NCV studies, surgical decompression may be indicated. This is a procedure done under local anesthesia. A small incision is made at the wrist and the carpal ligament is cut. This relieves the pressure on the median nerve. Success rate for this surgery is approximately 90%.

If you feel that you have carpal tunnel syndrome, you should see a neurologist and have diagnostic studies performed. Most patients will do well with conservative, non-surgical treatment. For more detailed information click here.


Posted in Nerve Diseases, Nerve Pain, Neuropathy and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , by

Migraine headaches are one of the most common neurological problems seen. There are an estimated 30 million affected American patients. Despite its common occurrence, fifty percent of affected individuals remain untreated. Why are there so many patients with migraine? A new report in Neurology Reviews has shed some light on migraine risk factors and how they progress.

In this study, conducted by neurologist and headache specialist Dr. Richard Lipton, they found that patients with chronic daily headaches were more likely to be female, overweight and depressed. Other risk factors for daily headaches include head injuries and snoring. Patients also contribute to developing daily headaches by overusing analgesics such as aspirin, ibuprofen or acetomenophen containing compounds – particularly those containing caffeine. Prescription medications containing narcotics, barbiturates and caffeine for migraine treatment also increased risk of more headaches. The overuse of all pain relievers results in rebound headaches. The more headaches you have the more medication you take – the more medication you take the more headaches you have. This cycle must be broken by stopping regular analgesic consumption.

Dietary factors play an important role migraine progression. Excessive caffeine or regular soda consumption constitute significantly to increased number of headaches. Major stress events clearly contribute to migraine progression. Obesity, defined by having a Body Mass Index (BMI) of greater than 30 was associated with a five times greater risk of developing chronic daily headache. The triptan medications, such as Imitrex, Maxalt and others, are excellent choices for treating acute migraine attacks. When they are overused, they can put a patient with frequent headaches at risk for progression to chronic daily headaches. In general, individuals with four headache days per month or less, who take any of the above medications, are not at risk for progression of their headaches to daily headache. If you have more that 4 headache days per month or frequently take pain relievers for headaches, you should see a neurologist headache specialist for evaluation and treatment. The first step to improve your quality of life is to pick up the phone and call.


Posted in Migraines / Headache and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , by

How many times have you had an appointment in your doctor’s office, gotten there on time and then had to wait 30 minutes, an hour or even more? We all have. It is one of the frustrating aspects of visiting your doctor’s office. Dr. Kassicieh, at Sarasota Neurology, understands that. He respects patients’ time and makes every effort to see patients at their scheduled appointment time. Dr. Kassicieh does not want his patients waiting for more than a few minutes after they check in, to be seen. He values their time as much as they do and understands his patients have other commitments and time constraints.
Dr. Kassicieh and his staff strive to make sure that his patients are seen in time, tests scheduled and they can leave within a reasonable amount of time. The availability of his website, www.DrKassicieh.com, patients can read about Dr. Kassicieh’s background and learn about the neurological problems he treats. These include neurological problems such as migraine headaches, neck and back pain, Parkinson’s disease, Botox medical therapy and many others. New patients have the availability to download all the required forms, allowing them the freedom to complete these accurately in the comfort of their own home. This saves a tremendous time for the patient in filling out paperwork in the office.
Once the patient comes into Sarasota Neurology, they are pleasantly greeted by our front office manager. Insurance is verified and the patient is brought back for their appointment in a very short time. With the state of the art electronic medical record keeping, Dr. Kassicieh is able to provide better, more efficient care to his patients. Consultations, lab and x-ray as well as other tests and referrals are generated electronically. Once your visit is completed, the completed office visit is immediately faxed to your primary care physician and any consulting physicians you request. Your prescriptions are already printed and waiting for you at check out.
In summary, we here at Sarasota Neurology strive to make the patient comfortable and have a pleasurable experience. You are provided with timely, state-of-the-art medical and neurological care – based on evidence based medicine.  We look forward to seeing our patients and treat them with the respect they deserve. Thank you for visiting our blog site and would invite you to visit Dr. Kassicieh’s website for more information.


Posted in Welcome and tagged , , , , , , , , , by

Recent studies have suggested that qualifying Parkinson patients benefit from earlier treatment with deep brain stimulation, as reported in Clinical Neurology News. The study indicates that younger Parkinson disease patients are more likely to benefit from early brain stimulator treatment. There is information that may suggest that this therapy may have a protective effect in delaying the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was FDA approved in 2002 for treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Symptoms that are best controlled include tremor and dyskinesias although brain stimulation can also help reduce freezing and off time. Younger Parkinson patients develop motor complications such as dyskinesias, off time and freezing much earlier than older patients with Parkinson’s disease. As reported by Dr. David Charles, a Vanderbilt University Medical Center Parkinson neurologist, “No therapy…has bee shown to slow the progression of Parkinson’s.” The previous thinking was to wait until a patient had severe motor complications that could not be controlled with medications prior to considering DBS therapy. The new thinking, and research, is exploring benefits of DBS in earlier stages of Parkinson’s disease. In various reported cases, patients not only benefited from better control of their Parkinson motor symptoms but also had improved quality of life. Added advantages is that Parkinson patients treated earlier with DBS used less medications over an 18 month period, as shown in one small study. There are two studies currently looking at the benefits of early DBS therapy in Parkinson patients: EARLYSTIM is a French study and a smaller study at Vanderbilt University are in progress. It should be noted that Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Even patients with DBS therapy do have progression of their symptoms. Memory loss can be a part of the Parkinson syndrome and is not helped by DBS therapy. DBS is not a substitute for optimal neurological and medication management of Parkinson symptoms. Dr. Kassicieh, at Sarasota Neurology, provides medical and neurological management for patients with Parkinson’s disease and brain stimulators. For more information click here.


Posted in Botox, Brain Stimulation, Memory Loss / Alzheimer's Disease / Dementia, Movement Disorders, Nerve Pain, Parkinson's disease, Stroke and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , by

Post-concussion syndrome (PCS) results from injuries to the head. This can range from mild concussions (being struck on the head) to severe head injuries. Not always does the degree of head trauma correlate with the degree and symptoms of PCS. It is estimated that approximately 60-80% of patients suffering a moderate to severe concussion, traumatic brain injury (TBI), will develop PCS. In milder head injuries, PCS will develop up in up to 40-50% of injured individuals. Loss of consciousness is not a requirement for development of PCS. It is not even a requirement that there be a direct head injury. Patients who have sudden jerking movements of the head, particularly in car accidents, with out direct head trauma can suffer from PCS. Risk factors for development of PCS can include lower education level, drug or alcohol abuse, prior head injuries, or preexisting depression or anxiety. The recognition and diagnosis of the symptoms of PCS are important in helping affected patients to return to normal a quickly as possible.

The symptoms of PCS may develop immediately or make take days to several weeks to become apparent. Headaches and dizziness are the most common complaints in patients with PCS. These however are not the only symptoms that can be associated with PCS. Varying degrees of memory loss, concentration difficulty, anxiety, depression, irritability, emotional and behavioral disturbances, insomnia and personality changes. The headaches can vary from mild, dull, generalized headache to severe migraine like headaches. These headaches usually occur daily and can be quite debilitating. Dizziness can be anywhere from lightheadedness to a spinning type of dizziness known as vertigo. Patient can have irritability, anxiety and depression, partly due to the head injury but also from the persistence of their symptoms. Insomnia frequently accompanies these other psychological symptoms. In more severe case, behavioral changes can occur. Patients can become impulsive and irrational in their behavior. Psychological changes are more apparent later in the course of PCS. Decreased ability to concentrate and slowness in mental function can occur, particularly in higher functioning individuals.

Treatment for PCS is primarily time. Many of the symptoms of PCS will clear within days to a few weeks. A typical time for clearing of symptoms is usually 3 months and as much as 6 months. In 10-15% of the cases it can take a year or more for improvement. The earlier the diagnosis is made, generally the better the outcome. Headaches and dizziness complaints most commonly bring the patient to a doctor’s office. Patients may have tension headaches, migraine headaches or a condition known as occipital neuralgia. The latter is an injury to the occipital nerve at the base of the skull. The most effective treatment for this condition is an occipital nerve block. Other headache conditions are treated with the usual preventative migraine medications protocols. As anxiety, irritability and depression are common symptoms of PCS, the antidepressant medications are the most effective treatment for both the headaches and psychological symptoms. Antidepressant medications have been used for decades in controlling migraine and other headache disorders. Over-the-counter analgesics can be used to relieve headache and neck pains. Narcotics should be avoided as they are addictive and do not help the overall patient outcome.  Mayo Clinic has an excellent, comprehensive summary of post-concussion syndrome.

In patients who have persistent complaints of memory loss, concentration difficulties, forgetfulness, anxiety and depression, neuropsychological testing followed by counseling can be helpful in patient management and improvement of symptoms. Testing is usually not done for at least 3-6 months following the head injury. This is because so many patients will spontaneously improve over this time period. Once testing is completed, the psychologist can help the patient through counseling to improve their overall well being. Other diagnostic tests may be performed and can include MRI brain studies, EEG or PET scan.

Prognosis for patients with PCS is excellent in the majority of the cases. Most patients are back to their normal baseline within a few weeks, with a few taking as long a 3 months. It is far less common for patients to continue having symptoms beyond this. It is estimated that only about 15% of patients with PCS will have symptoms a year or more. Early treatment by experienced neurologists or other physicians who have training in treatment of concussion, traumatic brain injuries and post-concussion syndrome are important in improving a patient’s quality of life in as short of period of time as possible.


Posted in Memory Loss / Alzheimer's Disease / Dementia, Migraines / Headache and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , by